Andaman Green Bronzeback ( Dendrelaphis andamanensis Anderson, 1871 )

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Name
Scientific Name: 
Dendrelaphis andamanensis (Anderson, 1871)
Regional Names: 
English: 
Andaman Bronzeback
Photographs: 
Head profile imag of Dendrelaphis andamanensis
Distribution: 
Found only in open and dense forests of Andaman and Little Andaman Islands.
Family: 
Characteristics for identification: 

Morphologically it can be easily identified by checking yellowish-green dorsal body marked with black edge on dorsal scales. In its distribution range it is regularly sighted at day time by tourists and locals.

Description: 

Average length- 100 cm.
Maximum length- 130 cm.

Dorsal -
Body thin, long, covered with smooth scales. Scales arranged in oblique manner with top row along vertebra larger than adjacent dorsals. Color bright grass green or yellowish-green or bluish-green with oblique dark patterns mainly confined on foreside. Majority of dorsals edged with black.

Ventral -
Belly scales sharply folded upwards. Color pale green or yellowish-green; sometimes darker on keeled region.

Head -
Head flattened, elongated and clearly broader than neck. Upper lip color similar to belly. Top of the head patternless green. A black streak separates upper lip and dorsal colors on both side of eyes and ends on temporal region. Tongue color reddish. Large eyes with rounded pupils.

Tail -
Very long and thin tail; color similar to dorsal with faint patterns. Subcaudal scales paired in zig-zag manner.

Scalation
Head: 
Supralabial 9; 4th slightly or not and 5th & 6th below eyes and in good contact; loreal 1; postocular 2-3; total 11–16 temporal scales (2+2 or 2+3 rows).
Dorsal: 
Smooth and obliquely arranged scales in 15: 15: 9/11 rows; vertebral scales enlarged, larger than first dorsal rows.
Ventral: 
176-196; with sharp lateral keel; anal divided.
Sub Caudal: 
125-146; paired.
Diet: 
Feeds actively on geckos, other lizards, frogs, small birds etc.
Threats: 
Road kill mortality and killing due to fear are two direct threats in its range. Like other endemic island species this species is under verge of extinction due to climate change.
Authors & Contributors: